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Discussion of details about using and preparing Sacraments
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sodium chlorite - the other 20% 23 Jan 2013 22:20 #29562

  • naomi
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I've been looking at the technical specs for various sodium chlorite powders that are available. Jim says that as long as it's a technical grade at 80%, it's good. But I've been seeing that the powders contain a variety of undesirable contaminants in the remaining 20%, such as arsenic, lead, mercury, sodium chlorate, sodium hydroxide, sodium sulfate...

Would these contaminants not be harmful to the body?

How does the sodium chlorite react with these molecules once activated with the citric acid?

Do these contaminants get destroyed by the activated sodium chlorite?
If so, how long would it take for the activated solution to destroy these other things?
Would it be best to let it sit a while before drinking it?

Have there been any tests done indicating that these things become inert?

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sodium chlorite - the other 20% 25 Jan 2013 22:49 #29647

  • naomi
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Thank you for your thoughts. I did mean sodium sulfate.
I'm trying to understand the data in the tech. specs., so I have more questions.

EPA approved does not mean pharmaceutical grade, is that correct? But is safe for food and water, as you mentioned.

Then if the tech. specs. do not include heavy metals, would that mean that it wasn't tested for heavy metals or that it does not contain it?


this is a sample line of one of the technical specifications:
characteristic - sodium chlorate, as NaCLO3
unit - Wt.%
value - 0.58
min - no value
max - 4.00

Does this mean that this particular powder has 0.58 % of sodium chlorate in it? (which would be ok, but not as good as zero)

What exactly do these numbers mean?

Is the "value" the actual amount found in the batch or an average based on random testing?

Is "max" the maximum allowed by set standards
or
is it the maximum amount that may be in the product, if this particular batch was not tested?


thanks for the help... and sorry if this was answered somewhere, but I have not seen it.

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Last edit: by naomi.

sodium chlorite - the other 20% 28 Jan 2013 00:30 #29729

  • pneumatician
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every chemical product come with a "certificate of analysis" where all the "contaminants" are listed in %

unless you have the product analysis, you are playing russian roulette.

you can contact with the seller and ask origin or if have a copy of the "certificate of analysis" o the web page where you can download.
~~~
llucifer.in

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sodium chlorite - the other 20% 28 Feb 2013 05:13 #31137

  • patricio
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I used to use this product with the analysis certificate sodium chlorite?, For MMS, but I think that the results in arsenic, Pb and mercury are high, example

using citric acid and water that is changed?

As 3ppm Máx. < 3 ppm
Hg 0.1ppm Máx. < 0.1ppm
Pb 1ppm Máx. < 1ppm

NEW CHINA CHEMICALS.,LTD

ANALItic
item specification results
NaClO2 80% Mín. 80.45
NaClO3 4.0% Máx. 1.1
NaCl 17.0% Máx. 15.50
NaOH 3.0% Máx. 0.55%
Na2CO3 2.0% Máx. 0.6%
Na2SO4 3.0% Máx. 0.4%
NaNO3 0.1% Máx. < 0.1%
As 3ppm Máx. < 3 ppm
Hg 0.1ppm Máx. < 0.1ppm
Pb 1ppm Máx. < 1ppm
H2O 0.1% Máx. < 0.01%

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Last edit: by patricio.
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