Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
MMS: sodium chlorite (NaClO2) 28%
MMS1 or Activated MMS: chlorine dioxide (ClO2)
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC:

does mms kill good bacteria? 16 Oct 2020 13:47 #66252

  • IslandEternal
  • IslandEternal's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Senior Boarder
  • Senior Boarder
  • Posts: 60
  • Thank you received: 10
if it doesn't how is that possible?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

does mms kill good bacteria? 16 Oct 2020 20:13 #66259

  • orv
  • orv's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Boarder
  • Senior Boarder
  • Posts: 74
  • Thank you received: 21
The answer is no not at all. It dosen't interfere with the good bacteria at all. I have heard that since 2009 from many sources . chlorine dioxide seeks out harmful pathogens of all types but knows the difference . Unbelievable isn't it. I always said that it is a gift of God for the last days. More and more bacterias and viruses are said to be resistant to antibiotics. They just are no cures for many diseases including several VD's. But chlorine dioxide just seems to work very well. Except for a few funguses and molds which Jim Humble explains in his Recovery Guidebook to use Bentonite clay and there also how to use it there. His best book on how to use mms by far. Total explanations. What blessing that book is for mankind. So detailed and easy to understand. Answers most of the questions people ask on this web site about mms. A must for anyone wanting to use mms.
The following user(s) said Thank You: CLO2

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

does mms kill good bacteria? 17 Oct 2020 08:05 #66266

  • CLO2
  • CLO2's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 4150
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 3130
The following is from page 67 in Andreas Kalcker's book Forbidden Health:

"The fascinating thing is that not only is chlorine dioxide selective, but it also reacts differently to each pathogen. The more acidic the bacteria are, the stronger the chemical oxidation reaction. The less acid they are, the weaker the oxidation. That is why it does not affect symbiotic bacteria as much, as they usually have a pH range closer to the body (hence, they are symbiotic)."
The following user(s) said Thank You: woofy, SurfHaven

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Last edit: by CLO2.
  • Page:
  • 1