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TOPIC: Can chlorine dioxide induce Copper and Tin deficiency ?

Can chlorine dioxide induce Copper and Tin deficiency ? 20 Nov 2019 19:04 #61704

  • Infinitely Curious
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As you know, Chlorine Dioxide eliminates toxic heavy metals from our body by oxidizing them. That's pretty amazing.

However, what worried me is that two of the heavy metals found in our body can't be totally removed, because they are essential for our body functions. I'm talking about Copper and Tin, which are also heavy metals. There isn't so much information about Tin, but Copper is well known as one of the most important chemicals for proper brain function. High levels of Copper is toxic, but low levels are "bad" too.

According to Dr William J Walsh, author of the book Nutrient Power, copper excess (total copper above 135 μg/dL) occurs in 90% of woman with psychiatric conditions. However low levels of copper (below 90 μg/dL) also causes problems, such as the lack of empathy. Within incarcerated population (prison members), Dr Walsh found that 96% of them had their Copper-to-Zinc ratios our of range (36% were high, 60% were low, and only 4% were in ideal range). On the other hand, among control subjects (average person, not in prison) only 3% had their Cu/Zn out of the ideal range (97% were in ideal range).

So my question is, has anyone of you done Copper/Tin blood tests or hair tests before and after using CDS/MMS continuously?

I must note that heavy metal accumulation is intracelular, not in blood serum. Thus when heavy metals are leaving the body, the blood serum level actually increases before it decreases. This effect is analog to the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction related to bacteria toxins.

I know one person who took CDS for a couple of days, made a blood exam after that, and serum copper levels had increased considerably compared to previous exam (from 95 μg/dL to 130 μg/dL). Her previous blood exam was done 10 months earlier, so I do not know her copper status just before experimenting CDS. But she had been doing therapy with Zinc and B6 to lower her copper levels for the last 10 months. So the result is very unexpected. She will do another exam soon. Then I expect the copper levels to have lowered, which will be a strong indicative that she was releasing excess copper. Her sister, on the other hand, had different results. Her sister measured about the same in both exams (70 μg/dL), despite having gone through the same steps (same blood exam dates, same Zinc/B6 therapy and same CDS usage).

By now, my empiric conclusion is that CDS seems to help with the removal of intracelular heavy metals but only when they are in excess. Although more evidence is needed to consolidate this conclusion.

Thoughts ?
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Can chlorine dioxide induce Copper and Tin deficiency ? 19 Dec 2019 23:36 #61937

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The following is a list of heavy metals sorted by weight:
Osmium1402
Iridium1396
Platinum1339
Gold1207
Tungsten1204
Mercury849
Ruthenium765
Rhodium755
Palladium712
Lead708
Silver655
Molybdenum638
Bismuth611
Copper560
Monel Metal556
Nickel556
Cobalt553
Gun Metal (Aver.)544
Bronze (Approx.)541
Cadmium541
Brass (Approx.)536
Stainless Steel (18-8 )494
Iron491
Steel, Cast/Rolled490
Bronze, Alum.481
Iron,Wrought480
Manganese463
Tin456
Zinc445
Iron,Cast Grey442
Chromium428
Antimony420
Vanadium375
Titanium283
Iron,Slag172
Aluminum168
Beryllium114
Magnesium109

Source: www.coyotesteel.com/assets/img/PDFs/weightspercubicfoot.pdf

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Can chlorine dioxide induce Copper and Tin deficiency ? 20 Dec 2019 05:53 #61940

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Interesting. I have been experimenting with zinc for many years topically. I have never did any blood test. In using large amounts of zinc everything gets worse for a long time before it gets better. In the wintertime when it's cold it is a bad time to use a lot of zinc. I had itchiness coming out of my intestines for many years and in the winter it affected my mind(comprehension, anxiousness along with many other symptoms. Now without the itchiness coming out it does not affect my mind during the winter. The first three years were very bad I did not have fibromyalgia but when I started using zinc I would consider I had it for at least three years. After using it for 7 1/2 years I have removed I would say about 90% of all viral problems. And I would have to say it has saved my life although it is extremely dangerous to use. For example many years ago I had something happen that was kind of like a ruptured appendix, I learned to wash it off after a very short time instead of leaving a couple drops on. When that happen I had liquid in the lungs for about 2 1/2 weeks not stopping using zinc and splashing it on my back a small amount and washing it off I had a small hole show up right by the tailbone through the skin and it drain CCF for almost 2 months every day splashing on just enough to keep the whole open. That was probably very dangerous I almost went in to get liquid drained out of my lungs but I am very stubborn when it comes to going to doctors.

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Can chlorine dioxide induce Copper and Tin deficiency ? 11 Jan 2020 01:55 #62116

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dog1824,

I'm not sure if I understood your journey and why have you used zinc on your skin for so long. But I must add that absorbing too much zinc will lower your copper levels too much, because zinc and copper are antagonists. Excessive zinc (above 200 mg per day) may deplete your copper levels, which should be replenished. In such case perhaps just 1 or 2 mg per day of copper will be enough, because copper accumulates in our cells.

Blood tests should not be too expensive. Ideally, for proper mental functioning, you'd want serum copper levels to be slightly lower than serum zinc levels, up to 30% below, at max.

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