Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: How does MMS distinguish between good and bad bacteria?

How does MMS distinguish between good and bad bacteria? 05 Oct 2015 09:17 #50281

  • MikeF
  • MikeF's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 1
  • Thank you received: 0
Good day to All

I have been using MMS1 (3 activated drops per capsule 2x weekly) as a maintenance dose for the past 18 months. I have found it very helpful for clearing up the minor aches and pains that I had. Strangely, my bladder capacity seems to have increased, meaning that now I don't need to get up in the night. The capsules totally avoid the bad MMS taste.
I have also used the spray and bath protocols.

My question:
My understanding is that chlorine dioxide is highly selective; targeting only pathogens while not affecting healthy body cells.
But how exactly does MMS distinguish between beneficial gut bacteria, and harmful pathogens in the body? Or does MMS simply destroy all bacteria?

I have read Jims book - Master Mineral Solution of the Third Millenium, but this point is not clear to me.
I take probiotics regularly - maybe this replaces the good bacteria killed by MMS?

Thanks for all your good work.

Mike

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

How does MMS distinguish between good and bad bacteria? 11 Oct 2015 04:36 #50305

  • marti
  • marti's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Boarder
  • Senior Boarder
  • Posts: 54
  • Thank you received: 9
This forum slowly dying ....
This interested me too, but if you think about it himself, MMS kills any bacteria......
The following user(s) said Thank You: Tomas

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

How does MMS distinguish between good and bad bacteria? 11 Oct 2015 05:42 #50306

  • CLO2
  • CLO2's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 3888
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 2951
Jim answers this question in his 2011 book.

If MMS killed all bacteria we would be hearing complaints about that happening, but we don't.

Think about that....
The following user(s) said Thank You: fourfingerz, MMS_7

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

How does MMS distinguish between good and bad bacteria? 12 Oct 2015 02:36 #50318

  • pneumatician
  • pneumatician's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Expert Boarder
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 147
  • Thank you received: 50

MikeF wrote: Good day to All
My question:
My understanding is that chlorine dioxide is highly selective; targeting only pathogens while not affecting healthy body cells.
But how exactly does MMS distinguish between beneficial gut bacteria, and harmful pathogens in the body? Or does MMS simply destroy all bacteria?
I have read Jims book - Master Mineral Solution of the Third Millenium, but this point is not clear to me.
I take probiotics regularly - maybe this replaces the good bacteria killed by MMS?
Mike


you need to make in-vitro and in-vivo tests
in-vitro, grow a colony bacteria in a petri dish and test with MMS, if the bacteria die, ok, if not, bad.
this is a procedure from the pseudoscience called "biomakealotofmoneyfornothing" :)
the antibiotics simply KILL EVERYTHING till no more ammo.
exist millions if not billions of different microorganism called virus, bacteria, fungus, amoebas... this is a herculean work. I don't known if MMS people have a good lab and are doing this type of test. If you are interested in some type of microorganism specifically, depending where you live you can do this test for yourself in a community lab.
but the bad news is: virus, parasites... are everywhere, inclusive in incredible things like alcohol. parasites eating your brain, eating... a terror film!! so always the best is a strong immune system!!

probiotics is a good choice after a batch of antibiotics.
~~~
llucifer.in

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

How does MMS distinguish between good and bad bacteria? 16 Jun 2020 04:10 #64772

  • Ryan77
  • Ryan77's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 12
  • Thank you received: 1
So what’s the answer? Does it work?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

How does MMS distinguish between good and bad bacteria? 17 Jun 2020 02:06 #64781

  • Dawna
  • Dawna's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 342
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 281
Chlorine dioxide deactivates microorganisms by breaking the bacterial cell wall, or, in the case of viruses, by loosening the viral envelope. This action occurs immediately upon exposure.

Because animal cells do not have cell "walls", as do microorganisms, human tissue is not affected by the same action. For this reason, chlorine dioxide is safe for use in drinking water as well as for application to the skin.

Of importance as well, the use of chlorine dioxide does not result in the creation of resistant strains of microorganisms, such as occur with other disinfectants like Triclosan, (which is in toothpaste)

Chlorine dioxide eliminates or neutralizes odor by a process known as oxidation. It is not a masking agent. The same oxidizing properties result in a bleaching or whitening action.

Above is from FrontierPharm.com where Dioxi Brite toothpaste is sold

Yes, it works!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Dawna.

How does MMS distinguish between good and bad bacteria? 23 Jun 2020 07:08 #64868

  • Drummerchuck
  • Drummerchuck's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 12
  • Thank you received: 20
I answered this in a more recent 'good bacteria" question thread from April, but I see this was brought back from 2015 and is on the same topic so I'll copy/paste my reply again as this question burned in my mind as well. Just boils down to oxidation-reduction potential [ORP]. Like Dr. JH says as well, we handle oxidation, we are oxidative systems, we breathe oxygen in order to survive and oxygen is carried throughout the body.

From the more recent thread:

I had to dive deeper into biology to wrap my own head around this. You'll read in the books/wikis/forums about how ClO2 is a weak oxidizer, it has a ORP [oxidation reduction potential] of 0.98 volts, roughly. Compare that to Oxygen at 1.28 volts. So what it comes into contact with in our bloodstream and digestive tracks are only going to be oxidized if they have ORP voltage levels where that is possible. The "bad guys" bacteria are mostly at or about -200 mV, or -.2 volts, so they are oxidized easily while our "good guys" bacteria are closer to 1 volt. In other words, ClO2 passes right by those good guys just like oxygen does, since they are similar in their oxidative potentials. I'm sure this is a bit more complicated than just my simplistic explanation here, but it's where I'm at presently and it fits in line with the results from the research [of no measurable harm or ill physiological effects from ClO2 ingestion at protocol levels].
The following user(s) said Thank You: Huffsdad

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

How does MMS distinguish between good and bad bacteria? 24 Jun 2020 22:50 #64893

  • Dawna
  • Dawna's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 342
  • Karma: 1
  • Thank you received: 281
Simply put ~

Good bacteria has an oxygen molecule, MMS has an oxygen molecule.
Bad bacteria lacks a oxygen molecule.
MMS seeks all molecules without oxygen, it gives them a hug to save them, but the oxygen kills it.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Dawna.
  • Page:
  • 1