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What is the root cause of Vitiligo? 13 Jul 2020 10:17 #65132

  • aydarbeya
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Hello everyone,
I was wondering about the root cause of the disease called VITILIGo which is a skin issue occurs when the pigment-producing cells (melanocytes) die or stop producing melanin. Is this related into some kind of inflammation of an organ ?

Do you think chlorine dioxide might help it ?

Thanks ...
Pulvis et umbra sumus
Horace

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What is the root cause of Vitiligo? 13 Jul 2020 13:59 #65136

  • Kablos
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Thats a good question as I have it on my hands and would like to know also. Some say its oxidative damage of which the whole free-radical, anti-oxidant, positive or negative charged oxygen ion etc theory's are ambiguous and contradictory to say the least. Others say it due to allergy's causing inflammation whereas the body attacks itself thinking its doing repairs again using oxygen...

There is a video out there (or was) of a fella claiming all his Vitiligo was fixed with MMS but I have as yet not had any success but then I tend to be very inconsistent with using it.
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What is the root cause of Vitiligo? 13 Jul 2020 16:17 #65139

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Thanks for the answer and I hope you can find a solution with CD. Please keep us posted if you have any improvements related to CD.
Pulvis et umbra sumus
Horace

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What is the root cause of Vitiligo? 14 Jul 2020 12:27 #65150

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I've recently found a chapter in Kalcker's book about vitilgo. There's also a link into a video t.e. sti.moni.al of a vitiligo patient where he explains how he get cured by using CD :ohmy: . First signs of improvement appears at third month and fully cured after two years.
Pulvis et umbra sumus
Horace
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What is the root cause of Vitiligo? 03 Sep 2020 07:00 #65792

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aydarbeya wrote: There's also a link into a video t.e. sti.moni.al of a vitiligo patient where he explains how he get cured by using CD :ohmy: . .


Interesting. Good find, can you post a link to the video here I would like to take a lookey.

Do you have Vitiligo aydarbeya?

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What is the root cause of Vitiligo? 03 Sep 2020 07:40 #65793

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VITILIGO develops when the ulceration reaches into the basal layer of the skin that consists of melanin-producing cells. The depigmentation creates the white patches typical for vitiligo (compare with tinea versicolor involving the corium skin; see also Scarlet Fever). The separation conflict related to the deepest layer of the epidermis is – subjectively - perceived as particularly cruel or “brutal” (loss of a loved one, physical abuse). The white macules appear at the site(s) associated with the separation. Hair that grows on areas affected with vitiligo turns white. Albinism, characterized by white skin and white hair, is caused by a generalized, “brutal” separation conflict suffered by the unborn child. Due to the complete loss of the pigmented skin layer a repigmentation is no longer possible, even if the conflict is resolved.

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What is the root cause of Vitiligo? 03 Sep 2020 09:09 #65795

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marti wrote: The separation conflict related to the deepest layer of the epidermis is – subjectively - perceived as particularly cruel or “brutal” (loss of a loved one, physical abuse). ..... is caused by a generalized, “brutal” separation conflict suffered by the unborn child. Due to the complete loss of the pigmented skin layer a repigmentation is no longer possible, even if the conflict is resolved.


Heh?

So Vitiligo is some new age voodoo thing?

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What is the root cause of Vitiligo? 03 Sep 2020 12:57 #65796

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read a little more about vitiligo to make it clearer. It is a biological conflict - a separation conflict ...
DEVELOPMENT AND FUNCTION OF THE EPIDERMIS: The epidermis (outer skin) covers the underlying corium skin (dermis or under skin). The epidermis is predominantly responsible for sensory perception such as temperature, pressure, and touch. Most cells in the epidermis are keratinocytes (keratin-producing cells) that originate in the deepest layer of the epidermis, called the stratum basale. This layer also contains pigment-producing melanocytes (the majority of melanocytes are, however, in the corium skin). From the basal layer, keratinocytes migrate through the stratum spinosum and stratum granulosum up to the stratum corneum. Once they reach the surface of the skin, they are gradually shed and replaced by newer cells pushed up from below. Keratin is also the main structural component of hair and nails. The epidermis consists of keratinized squamous epithelium, originates from the ectoderm and is therefore controlled from the cerebral cortex.
BRAIN LEVEL: The epidermis is controlled from the sensory cortex (part of the cerebral cortex). The skin of the right side of the body is controlled from the left side of the sensory cortex; the skin of the left side of the body is controlled from the right cortical hemisphere. Hence, there is a cross-over correlation from the brain to the organ (see GNM diagram showing the sensory homunculus).
BIOLOGICAL CONFLICT: The biological conflict linked to the epidermis is a separation conflict experienced as a loss of physical contact (see also separation conflict related to the periosteum).
In line with evolutionary reasoning, territorial conflicts, sexual conflicts, and separation conflicts are the primary conflict themes associated with organs of ectodermal origin, controlled from the sensory, pre-motor sensory and post-sensory cortex.
Newborns suffer the conflict when they are separated from the mother at birth (put in an incubator, given up for adoption). A separation conflict can already occur intrauterine, for example, because of ultrasound procedures. The ultrasound noise drowns out the heartbeat of the mother, which can be highly traumatic for the fetus; each ultrasound test triggers a conflict relapses for the unborn (see Down syndrome). For an infant the mother is the most important attachment figure; the mother protects her child and can prevent conflicts from happening. Hence, when a small child has a separation conflict (or, for example, a scare-fright conflict/territorial fear conflict) then the mother was usually absent when the DHS occurred. Children also experience separation conflicts when they are scolded, punished or abused, when a new sibling is born who gets more attention, when the parents split up, when they are not allowed to see their friends, when they have to separate from a favorite doll, teddy bear, stuffed animal or pet they like to cuddle; also, when the mother goes back to work, when they are put into daycare, kindergarten or to relatives, or when they are left with a sitter or nanny. Similarly, the elderly feel separated from the “pack” when they have to move into a nursing home or after the death of a life-long spouse or companion. The fear of losing touch or contact with someone (the threat of a divorce, a difficult long-distance or weekend relationship, the fear that a loved one might leave, move away, or die) or feeling rejected by a person, let’s say, because of a disagreement can evoke the conflict. Pets suffer separation conflicts, for example, when their master leaves or dies or when they are put in a kennel. By the same token, the conflict refers to wanting to separate from a person in the sense of wanting but not being able to push someone away (literally or figuratively), for example, a terrorizing boss or teacher, an annoying colleague or schoolmate, or an abusive parent or spouse (compare with touch-conflict of not wanting to be touched related to the myelin sheath).
A separation conflict also pertains to wanting to separate from something close to the skin (face mask, oxygen mask, a helmet, hat, clothing, shoes, tight stockings, wet linen, wet diapers). The same applies to a separation from something that one is no longer allowed or able to touch (a musical instrument, keyboard, tennis racket, golf club, steering wheel) or feel on the skin (an engagement ring, a favorite pillow) - see localized separation conflict. NOTE: A separation from a home is not a separation conflict in biological terms, since it does not relate to the skin but concerns the “territory” (see territorial loss conflict).
The Biological Special Program of the epidermis follows the OUTER SKIN SENSITIVITY PATTERN with hyposensitivity during the conflict-active phase and the Epileptoid Crisis and hypersensitivity in the healing phase.
CONFLICT-ACTIVE PHASE: During the conflict-active phase the epidermis ulcerates at the area(s) associated with the separation. The ulcerations are microscopic and usually go unnoticed. With continuing conflict activity, however, the skin becomes dry, rough, flaky, pale, and cold from poor blood circulation. Eventually, the skin begins to crack causing fissures that may bleed. If an intense conflict persists for a long period of time, the skin opens at the ulcerated area (see leg ulcers). Ichthyosis, a skin condition characterized by fine scaling similar to fish-scales, is also an indication of long and intense conflict activity. A severe form of ichthyosis is termed Netherton syndrome, assumed to be a genetic disease.
On the scalp, the flaky skin shows as dandruff. Deep ulceration of the epidermal skin causes hair loss (alopecia); also in pets.
In this example, the bald spots are exclusively on the left side of the scalp. This reveals that the loss of physical contact (say, missing to be stroked on the head) is related to a partner if the man is left-handed or to his mother if he is right-handed.
With the resolution of the conflict, the hair starts growing back.

Because of the loss of epidermal cells the sensitivity of the skin decreases (compare with hyposensitivity related to the periosteum). If the separation conflict is severe the skin can become completely numb (sensory paralysis). Sudden sensory numbness, for example of an arm or leg, is often confused with a stroke. A brief reactivation of the sensory paralysis arises during the Epileptoid Crisis.
A typical symptom of the conflict-active phase is a short-term memory loss, which serves the purpose to temporarily “forget” the one who was “torn from the skin” by blocking out the memory (in the animal world, a mother cat does no longer recognize her offspring when they are separated from her too early). The short-term memory loss reaches into the first part of the healing phase (PCL-A). In children, the poor memory shows as learning difficulties and focusing problems, nowadays labeled as Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). In adults, long-lasting separation conflicts can lead to dementia (see also (Post)Sensory Cortex Constellation).
NOTE: Short-term memory loss occurs during any Biological Special Program (in the conflict-active phase and PCL-A) involving the sensory, post-sensory, or premotor-sensory cortex because, in biological terms, the squamous epithelium of the entire organism is associated with a “separation conflict” (see, for example, biological conflict related to the milk ducts, mouth surface mucosa, nasal mucosa, or esophagus).
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What is the root cause of Vitiligo? 04 Sep 2020 02:54 #65805

  • Dawna
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Michael Jackson had it.
My husband has a cousin of vitiligo, alopecia, they are called an auto immune diseases of the skin.
My husband's hair all fell out as is usual with alopecia universalitis... 6-8 months went by then...
it started growing back in, white, but hey it is hair and he was 60.
I can't be sure of it, but coincidently that is also when we first started using mms. He still takes MMS2 one a day every other day, and he shampoos with J-Kat, which is a chlorine dioxide shampoo (it used to be sold for humans at the Frontier Pharma site, then J-Kat bought it and now sells for dogs and cats- it;s the same stuff).
It is certainly worth a try, the shampoo is expensive (50. with shipping), but maybe that is helping, could help on your skin. One thing is FOR SURE - it won't hurt !
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Last edit: by Dawna.
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